a 700- to 1,050-word paper comparing the main themes of the …

a 700- to 1,050-word paper comparing the main themes of the social-cognitive perspective with the humanistic perspective. a minimum of two peer-reviewed articles. citations in your paper consistent with APA guidelines Purchase the answer to view it

Comparing the Main Themes of the Social-Cognitive Perspective with the Humanistic Perspective

The field of psychology encompasses numerous theoretical perspectives, each with its unique focus and approach to understanding human behavior. Two such perspectives are the social-cognitive perspective and the humanistic perspective. While both provide valuable insights into human behavior and cognition, they differ in their fundamental assumptions, focus, and underlying themes. This paper aims to compare the main themes of the social-cognitive perspective with those of the humanistic perspective, drawing on evidence from peer-reviewed articles to support the discussion.

The social-cognitive perspective emphasizes the role of cognition and social factors in shaping behavior. It suggests that individuals learn by observing and imitating others, and through this observational learning, they acquire new behaviors and beliefs. This perspective also emphasizes the influence of cognitive processes, such as perception, attention, and memory, in shaping behavior. For example, Bandura’s (1977) social learning theory posits that individuals learn through a process of observation, imitation, and reinforcement, with cognitions playing a crucial role in this learning process.

In contrast, the humanistic perspective focuses on understanding individual experiences, personal growth, and self-determination. It places a strong emphasis on subjective experiences and the importance of free will and personal agency. According to Rogers (1951), individuals have an innate drive towards self-actualization, a process through which they strive to realize their fullest potential. This perspective also emphasizes the importance of human values, meaning, and purpose in guiding behavior.

Despite their differences, the social-cognitive and humanistic perspectives do share some common themes. Both perspectives recognize the importance of social factors in shaping behavior. While the social-cognitive perspective emphasizes the role of observational learning and social reinforcement, the humanistic perspective recognizes the impact of social interactions and relationships on personal growth and self-actualization. For example, Deci and Ryan (2000) propose that autonomy, relatedness, and competence are essential psychological needs that must be satisfied for individuals to thrive and achieve their full potential.

Moreover, both perspectives highlight the role of cognition in human behavior. The social-cognitive perspective emphasizes the influence of cognitive processes, such as attention, memory, and interpretation, in shaping behavior and learning. Similarly, the humanistic perspective recognizes the importance of cognitive processes, such as self-perception and interpretation of personal experiences, in understanding individual behavior and subjective well-being. For instance, Maslow (1968) proposed a hierarchy of needs, wherein individuals’ cognitive appraisal of their needs and goals influences their motivation and behavior.

However, despite these shared themes, there are notable differences between the social-cognitive and humanistic perspectives. One significant difference lies in their underlying assumptions about human nature. The social-cognitive perspective assumes that individuals are active agents who actively process information and construct their understanding of the world. It emphasizes the role of environmental influences and cognitive processes, such as observation, imitation, and cognitive restructuring. In contrast, the humanistic perspective assumes that individuals are inherently good and have an innate drive towards self-actualization. It emphasizes the importance of personal agency, free will, and subjective experiences in shaping behavior.

Another difference lies in their focus and scope of inquiry. The social-cognitive perspective primarily focuses on observable behavior and the cognitive processes that underlie it. It seeks to explain how individuals acquire new behaviors and beliefs through observational learning and cognitive processing. In contrast, the humanistic perspective focuses on subjective experiences, personal growth, and self-actualization. It seeks to understand how individuals develop a sense of meaning and purpose in life and strive to fulfill their unique potentials.

In conclusion, the social-cognitive perspective and the humanistic perspective offer distinct approaches to understanding human behavior and cognition. While both perspectives recognize the importance of social factors and cognition in shaping behavior, they differ in their underlying assumptions, focus, and themes. The social-cognitive perspective emphasizes the role of cognition and observational learning, while the humanistic perspective focuses on individual experiences, personal growth, and self-determination. By comparing and contrasting these perspectives, researchers can gain a more comprehensive understanding of human behavior and cognition, ultimately contributing to the advancement of psychological knowledge.