Describe why you think that paul and elder includes the exam…

Describe why you think that paul and elder includes the examples of Einstein and Darwin. How do these examples differ from what we are normally taught about the best thinkers? The paragraph is attached.

Paul and Elder include the examples of Einstein and Darwin in their work to highlight the characteristics and approaches that make these thinkers exceptional and distinct from what we are typically taught. These examples serve to challenge and expand our understanding of what it means to be a great thinker.

Typically, when we think of the best thinkers, we often focus on their accomplishments and the outcomes of their work. We are taught about their groundbreaking theories and discoveries, but we may not delve deeper into the thinking processes behind these achievements. In contrast, the example of Einstein and Darwin provided by Paul and Elder delves into the cognitive processes and habits of mind that set these thinkers apart.

One key aspect that differentiates Einstein and Darwin from what we are normally taught about the best thinkers is their emphasis on curiosity and questioning. Paul and Elder emphasize that great thinkers like Einstein and Darwin are driven by a deep sense of curiosity and exhibit a relentless desire to question and explore the unknown. They encourage us to see that it is not simply the answers they provided but the questions they asked that were truly revolutionary. By inviting us to focus on the questioning and exploratory mindset of these thinkers, Paul and Elder demonstrate the importance of curiosity in the process of intellectual growth.

Additionally, the examples of Einstein and Darwin challenge the notion that great thinkers possess innate genius and exceptional talent. While we often perceive great thinkers as possessing extraordinary abilities, Paul and Elder emphasize that what truly sets them apart is their commitment to disciplined thinking and intellectual virtues. They argue that Einstein and Darwin’s success can be largely attributed to their persistence, discipline, and willingness to engage in deep, critical thinking.

This focus on disciplined thinking highlights another aspect that differentiates Einstein and Darwin from what we are commonly taught. Often, we are taught to idolize great thinkers for their innate brilliance without fully understanding the cognitive processes that led to their achievements. However, as Paul and Elder argue, true intellectual growth requires deliberate and systematic thinking. Einstein and Darwin’s examples demonstrate that it is not enough to have a brilliant idea; one must also have the discipline to rigorously analyze, evaluate, and refine their thinking.

Moreover, the inclusion of Einstein and Darwin as examples of great thinkers challenges the traditional notion of genius being solitary in nature. Paul and Elder emphasize that intelligence and thinking are not solitary endeavors but are best developed through robust discussions, collaboration, and exposure to diverse perspectives. They argue that great thinkers, like Einstein and Darwin, actively sought out the insights and perspectives of others to further refine and develop their own ideas. This challenges the conventional view of brilliant individuals working in isolation and highlights the importance of engaging in meaningful dialogue and collaboration.

In conclusion, the examples of Einstein and Darwin provided by Paul and Elder serve to expand our understanding of what it means to be a great thinker. They challenge the conventional notions of genius and highlight the importance of curiosity, disciplined thinking, and collaboration in the process of intellectual growth. By focusing on the cognitive processes and habits of mind of these extraordinary thinkers, Paul and Elder encourage us to move beyond a superficial understanding of greatness and inspire us to cultivate these qualities within ourselves.