Speech Perception Worksheet Complete the following table. Pu…

Speech Perception Worksheet Complete the following table. Purchase the answer to view it Purchase the answer to view it Purchase the answer to view it Purchase the answer to view it Purchase the answer to view it

Speech Perception Worksheet

Table 1: Speech Perception and Phonological Processes

| Phonological Process | Definition | Example |
|———————-|———————————-|————————————————|
| Initial Consonant | The consonant sound at the | For the word “cat,” the initial consonant |
| Deletion | beginning of a word is omitted. | sound /k/ is omitted, resulting in “at.” |
|———————-|———————————-|————————————————|
| Final Consonant | The consonant sound at the end | For the word “dog,” the final consonant sound |
| Deletion | of a word is omitted. | /g/ is omitted, resulting in “do.” |
|———————-|———————————-|————————————————|
| Cluster Reduction | One or more consonants in a | For the word “spoon,” the cluster /sp/ is |
| | speech cluster are omitted | reduced, resulting in “poon.” |
|———————-|———————————-|————————————————|
| Consonant Substitution| One consonant sound is | For the word “cat,” the /t/ sound is replaced |
| | replaced with another consonant | with /d/, resulting in “cad.” |
| | sound. | |
|———————-|———————————-|————————————————|
| Voicing | The voiceless sound becomes | For the word “sing,” the voiceless /s/ |
| | voiced or vice versa. | sound becomes voiced /z/, resulting in “zing.” |
|———————-|———————————-|————————————————|
| Assimilation | One sound becomes more like | For the word “big dog,” the final /g/ sound |
| | another sound in the word. | assimilates to the initial /d/ sound, resulting|
| | | in “big dog.” |
|———————-|———————————-|————————————————|
| Vowel Substitution | One vowel sound is replaced | For the word “cat,” the /a/ vowel sound is |
| | with another vowel sound. | replaced with /i/, resulting in “cit.” |
|———————-|———————————-|————————————————|

Explanation of Phonological Processes:

1. Initial Consonant Deletion: This process involves the omission of the initial consonant sound in a word. For example, in the word “cat,” the initial /k/ sound is omitted, resulting in the word “at.”

2. Final Consonant Deletion: This process involves the omission of the final consonant sound in a word. For example, in the word “dog,” the final /g/ sound is omitted, resulting in the word “do.”

3. Cluster Reduction: This process involves the omission of one or more consonants in a speech cluster. For example, in the word “spoon,” the cluster /sp/ is reduced, resulting in the word “poon.”

4. Consonant Substitution: This process involves replacing one consonant sound with another consonant sound in a word. For example, in the word “cat,” the /t/ sound is replaced with /d/, resulting in the word “cad.”

5. Voicing: This process involves the change of a voiceless sound to a voiced sound or vice versa in a word. For example, in the word “sing,” the voiceless /s/ sound becomes the voiced /z/ sound, resulting in the word “zing.”

6. Assimilation: This process involves one sound becoming more like another sound in a word. For example, in the phrase “big dog,” the final /g/ sound assimilates to the initial /d/ sound, resulting in the phrase being pronounced as “big dog.”

7. Vowel Substitution: This process involves replacing one vowel sound with another vowel sound in a word. For example, in the word “cat,” the /a/ vowel sound is replaced with /i/, resulting in the word “cit.”

These phonological processes are commonly observed in speech perception and production. They can vary across different languages and dialects, and their occurrence may depend on various factors such as age, language acquisition stage, and speech disorders. Understanding these processes is crucial for studying speech perception and production and can help in diagnosing and treating speech disorders.